Conclusion

Conclusion


From before the dedication ceremony and continuing to the present, the Lewis and Clark monument experienced tremendous shifts in cultural significance. This project argued that these shifts came from society itself; thus giving the monument new connotative dimensions across the span of years. The monument, like many cultural objects, is unable to alter its denotative values of honor and the celebration of local history. In contrast, the members of the Charlottesville community act in part as the inculcators of new connotative values to fit their own interpretations and meanings. The monument as a cultural object never changed in its physical form - rather, society constructed its own significance around it. The changes in society created a monument which may be seen as plastic - a flexible object which we may fashion into any image we like. This illustrates how easily people may use cultural objects, such as public sculpture to represent personal ideals in a public space1. As Charlottesville continues to develop and grow, so will the connotative values of the Lewis and Clark monument. It will never lose its historical significance, but it will always act as a flexible memorial of three brave explorers.

Introduction/City Beautiful/Origins/Paul G. McIntire/Process/Interpretations/Conclusion/Works Cited