The Magical Space
The Magical Space

The department store was a grand space both on the inside and on the outside. The store structure itself lured people in with its actual form. Some had ornamental doorways, such as the Carson Pirie Scott and Company building in Chicago by Louis Sullivan. The building is shown above. Below this text, a close-up is shown of the the cast iron ornamentation on the entrance to Sullivan's department store.

The world of goods available were categorized into separate appointed spheres. Alan Trachtenberg in The Incorporation of America stated that these goods were "constructed and shaped by the store into objects of desire." Through advertising and the actual space of the department store, the consumer had been re-wired in the way that they saw and understood goods, and how they lived in society. In these palaces, consumers could buy more than goods; they could purchase a lifestyle and take it away with them.