SITE NAME
Montpelier and Madison's Tomb

COMMEMORATED BY
Historical Highway Marker
F-26

Virginia Landmarks Register
68-30
September 9, 1969

National Register of Historic Places
October 15, 1966

National Historic Landmark
December 19, 1060

LOCATION
Montpelier Station
Orange County

DESCRIPTION
Altered numerous times since its erection in 1760, Montpelier now is facing another remodeling: At the behest of the non-profit Montpelier Foundation, the duPont wings of the Mansion are to be removed in order to return the home to its state during the fourth U.S. president James Madison's residence. USA Today reported that the Foundation's president, Michael Quinn, attributes part of the reason for this revision to his wanting “visitors to understand Madison 's leadership role in drafting the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.” Known as “Father of the Constitution,” Madison lived at Montpelier for most of his life.

TEXT OF HIGHWAY MARKER
"Five miles southwest is Montpelier, the home of James Madison, "Father of the Constitution" and fourth president of the United States, 1809-1817. Near the house is the tomb of Madison, who died at Montpelier on June 28, 1836."

TEXT OF ENTRY ON VIRGINIA LANDMARKS REGISTER
"Montpelier, the lifelong home of James Madison, “Father of the Constitution” and fourth president of the United States, was also home to three generations of the Madison family from 1723 to 1844. The mansion core was built by Madison 's father ca. 1760. With advice of his friend Thomas Jefferson, Madison enlarged the house, adding the Tuscan portico ca. 1797. Additional changes were made ca. 1809 by James Dinsmore and John Neilson, master builders working for Jefferson. A domed garden temple was also built on the property. The house was further enlarged ca. 1900 by William duPont. Today it remains the nucleus of an 2,700-acre estate containing farmlands, forests, formal gardens, 135 buildings, and a steeplechase course. Madison and his wife Dolley lie buried in the family cemetery on the property. Montpelier is owned and exhibited by the National Trust for Historic Preservation."

John Hunter Holt Weems-Botts House


This site was created by Emily Kane as part of the University of Virginia's American Studies program.
For more information about AS@UVA, click below.

American Studies at U.Va.