"Lo and Lady Liberty as America's Reception Committee in Bronze!" from The Washington Post; February 27, 1910 pg. S4
Illustration from "Lo and Lady Liberty as America's Reception Committee in Bronze!" from The Washington Post; February 27, 1910 pg. S4

From the article:
"Will the memorial to the North American Indian be provided for by Congress this week?...On January 19 Mr. Goulden introduced a bill in the House of Representatives providing that there shall be erected, without expense to the United States Government, by Rodman Wanamaker, of New York City, and others, on a United States reservation, in the harbor of New York, a suitable memorial to the memory of the North American Indian."

"The picturesque idea of perpetuatting in art the memory of the race which will soon be remembered chiefly on the pages of history seems not only appropriate, but an act of justice. True, the Westerner who fought the redskin in pioneer days is not apt to grow enthusiastic to any marked degree over the melodramatic trappings with which the modern writer is wont to clothe him, but with all his savagery, the Indian was ever friendly and helpful when treated honestly and kindly."

"It should be a heroic monument, placed at the gateway of the New World, and intended to typify the country's debt to the 'first Americn,' and to remind the ages to come of the finer, better traits of the Indian, typified by his welcome, with hands outstretched, to the first white men to reach these shores."

"Mr. Owen said: 'The American Indian deserves to be remembered. No braver man has ever lived than he, no man more loyal to friendship, no man more self-sacrificing to others, no man with higher ideals of liberty...The Indian has had a great soul and has set a high example to the world, as a lover of freedom, a man of courage, of loyalty, and of fidelity. His commerical weakness, in despising property, has been a rude virtue. He has not been willing to be a slave to the acquirement of mere things.'"