American Studies Home Site Map Gallery of Prints Writing Across the Curriculum Currier & Ives Introduction Currier & Ives Opening

Clipper Ships

Clipper Ships, One on Fire, One Asea

"Burning of the Clipper Ship 'Golden Light'"and "A Squall off Cape Horn" (1856)

Clipper Ship Dreadnought and Real Ship Hit by Wave

"Clipper Ship Dreadnought off Tuscan Light" (1856).
Move mouse over image to view real clipper ship.

Clipper ships enthralled America during their heyday, from the early 1800s to the mid-1800s, during which time they hauled cargo throughout the world. Their speed and beauty represented the country's prosperity and progress, although it was this very progress that made their technology obsolete.

The advent of steam replaced clipper ships with steamboats and locomotives. Their gradual disappearance from the high seas made them a natural choice for a nostalgic series: Currier and Ives made at least 75 lithographs of clipper ships. (15)

Steamboats, one on the Mississippi, and a real one on the Ohio.
"Low Water in the Mississippi" (1868).
Rollover to "Cincinnati Steamboat, Ohio River" (1848).

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American Studies Home Site Map Gallery of Prints Writing Across the Curriculum Currier & Ives Introduction Currier & Ives Opening

Site created by Marcy McDonald, American Studies, UVA. Last modified: July 30, 2005. E-mail: asgrp@virginia.edu

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University of Virginia, www.virginia.edu