American Studies Home Site Map Gallery of Prints Writing Across the Curriculum Currier & Ives Introduction Currier & Ives Opening

Writing Across the Curriculum | Descriptive Writing | Narrative Writing | Expository Writing

Writing Across the Curriculum: Persuasive Writing

Do you agree that Americans turned to nostalgia in the late 1800s to ease their concerns about industrialization, immigration, and a society that was changing too rapidly? What role did science play in contributing to the fast pace of change? Use examples from the website and from one or two outside sources to support your viewpoint.

Remember that you can reason by examples that (ideally) show both sides of the argument but eventually make a stronger case for the side you are supporting. An argument that counters dissenting ideas with valid evidence is more effective than one that either ignores other viewpoints or uses simplistic statements as support.

You can reason by axiom (generalization), as long as the axiom is valid and applicable to the specific situation. You can also use a cause-and-effect argument (A happens because B happens, etc.). Be sure to state your premise in an introduction, and in your conclusion, restate it in relationship to the points you have made in the body of the argument. Cite all sources (including the website).

High School Students: Write an extended argument that examines the idea of nostalgia as a reaction to the political, social, and cultural upheaval in the context of any period in the twentieth century. Use the material on Currier and Ives as background and context for your argument.

Use at least three additional sources.

Writing Across the Curriculum | Descriptive Writing | Narrative Writing | Expository Writing

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American Studies Home Site Map Gallery of Prints Writing Across the Curriculum Currier & Ives Introduction Currier & Ives Opening

Site created by Marcy McDonald, American Studies, UVA. Last modified: July 30, 2005. E-mail: asgrp@virginia.edu

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University of Virginia, www.virginia.edu