Volume 1, Plate 7

Cedar Bird
Red bellied woodpecker
Yellow-throated Flycatcher
Purple Finch

Cedar Bird

"Notwithstanding the name chatterers given to them, they are perhaps the most silent species we have, making only a feeble, lisping sound, chiefly as they rise or alight....The season of love, which makes almost every other small bird musical, has no such effect on them, for they continue, at that interesting period, as silent as before."

Red-bellied Woodpecker

"They are certainly much hardier birds, and capable of subsisting on coarser and more various fare, and of sustaining a greater degree of cold, than several other of our woodpeckers. They are active and vigorous; and, being almost continually in search of insects that injure our forest trees, do not seem to deserve the injurious epithets that almost all writers have given them."

Yellow-throated Flycatcher

"This summer species is found chiefly in the woods, hunting among the high branches, and has an indolent and plaintive note, which it repeats, with some little variation, every ten or twelve seconds, like preeo preea, &c."

Purple Finch

"They...frequent the elm trees, feeding on the slender but sweet cover of the flowers; and as soon as the cherries put out their blossoms, feed almost exclusively on the stamina of the flowers; afterwards the apple blossoms are attacked in the same manner; and their depredations on these continue till they disappear, which is usually about the 10th or middle of May."