Volume 2, Plate 3

Rice Bunting and female
Red-eyed Flycatcher
Marsh Wren
Great Carolina Wren
Yellow-Throated Warbler

Red-eyed Flycatcher

"In Jamaica, where this bird winters, and is probably also resident, it is called...whip-tom-kelly, from an imagined resemblance of its notes to these words. And indeed, on attentively listening for some time to this bird in his full ardour of song, it requires but little imagination to fancy that you hear it pronounce these words, Tom-kelly, whip-tom-kelly!' very distinctly."

Marsh Wren

"Standing on the reedy borders of the Schuylkill or Delaware, in the month of June, you hear a low, crackling sound, something similar to that produced by air bubbles forcing their way through mud or boggy ground when trop upon; this is the song of the marsh wren. But as, among the human race, it is not given to one man to excel in every thing, and yet each, perhaps, has something peculiarly his own; so among birds, we find a like distribution of talents and peculiarities. The little bird now before us, if deficient and contemptible in singing, excels in the art of design, and constructs a nest, which, in durability, warmth, and convenience, is scarcely inferior to one, and far superior to many, of its more musical brethren."