Volume 2, Plate 7

American Sparrow Hawk
Field Sparrow
Tree Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Snow Bird

American Sparrow-Hawk

"One day I observed a bird of this species perched on the highest top of a large poplar, on the skirts of the wood, and was in the act of raising the gun to my eye, when he swept down, with the rapidity of an arrow, into a thicket of briers about thirty yards off, where I shot him dead, and, on coming up, found the small field sparrow quivering in his grasp. Both our aims had been taken in the same instant, and, unfortunately for him, both were fatal."

Field Sparrow

"The present species has never before, to my knowledge, been figured."

Song Sparrow

"It is the first singing bird in spring, taking precedence even of the pewee and blue bird. Its song continues occasionally during the whole summer and fall, and is sometimes heard even in the depth of winter. The notes or chant are short, but very sweet, resembling the beginning of the canary's song, and frequently repeated, generally from the branches of a bush or small tree, where it sits chanting for an hour together."

Snow Bird

" I cannot but consider this bird as the most numerous of its tribe of any within the United States. From the northern parts of th district of Main, to the Ogeechee river in Georgia, a distance, by the circuitous route in which I travelled, of more than 1800 miles, I never passed a day, and scarcely a mile without seeing numbers of these birds, and frequently large flocks of several thousands. Other travellers with whom I consversed, who had come from Lexington in Kentucky, through Virginia, also declared that they found these birds numerous along the whole road. It should be observed, that the roadsides are their favourite haunts, where many rank weeds that grow along the fences furnish them with food, and the road with gravel."