Volume 7, Plate 5

Spotted Sandpiper
Bartram's Sandpiper
Ring Plover
Sanderling Plover
Golden Plover
Killdeer Plover

Spotted Sandpiper

This species is as remarkable for perpetually wagging the tail, as some others are for nodding the head; for, whether running on the ground or on the fences, along the rails or in the water, this motion seems continual; even the young, as they are freed from the shell, run about constantly wagging the tail...The flight of this bird is usually low, skimming along the surface of the water, its long wings making a considerable angle downwards from the body, while it utter a rapid cry of weet, weet, weet, as it flutters along, seldom steering in a direct line up or down the river, but making a long circuitous sweep, stretching a great way out, and gradually bending in again to the shore.

Bartram's Sandpiper

This bird being, as far as I can discover, a new species, undescribed by any former author, I have honoured it with the name of my very worthy friend, near whose botanic gardens, on the banks of the river Schuylkill, I first found it. On the same meadows I have since shot several other individuals of the species, and have thereby had an opportunity of taking an accurate drawing as well as description of it.

Kildeer Plover

Nothing can exceed the alarm and anxiety of these birds during the breeding season. Their cries of kildeer, kildeer, as they winnow the air over head, dive and course around you, or run along the ground counterfeiting lameness, are shrill and incessant. The moment they see a person approach, they fly or run to attack him with their harassing clamour, continuing it over so wide an extent of ground, that they puzzle the pursuer as to the particular spot where the nest or young are concealed; very much resembling in this respect, the lapwing of Europe.