Cigarette Advertising Image Gallery
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A New York City taxi cab with a cigarette advertisement travels down Fifth Avenue Wednesday, May 15, 1996, in New York. Philip Morris USA, the nation's No. 1 tobacco company, said Wednesday it would back strong measures to cut tobacco use by minors, but only if the government drops efforts to regulate cigarettes. The maker of Marlboro cigarettes also called for a federal ban on all vending machine cigarette sales and for sweeping curbs on tobacco advertising. (AP Photo/Chris Kasson)
FILE-An ad for Chesterfield cigarettes in the Saturday Evening Post from 1933 is shown in this file photo. In a dramatic confession, the maker of Chesterfield cigarettes settled 22 state lawsuits Thursday, March 20, 1997 by agreeing to warn on every pack that smoking is addictive and admitting the industry markets cigarettes to teen-agers. (AP Photo/Raleigh News & Observer, Chuck Liddy)
FILE--A 1930's ad for Chesterfield cigarettes, a Liggett brand is shown in this July 19, 1996 file photo. In a dramatic confession, the maker of Chesterfield cigarettes settled 22 state lawsuits Thursday, March 20, 1997 by agreeing to warn on every pack that smoking is addictive and admitting the industry markets cigarettes to teen-agers. (AP Photo/Raleigh News & Observer/Chuck Liddy)
An Albanian man waits to sell firewood under a poster advertising western cigarettes near Tirana Thursday, Feb. 13, 1997. Albania, one of Europe's poorest country which is a blend of old and new as it tries to catch up with the rest of Europe, has been the site of protests in recent weeks, some violent after many Albanians lost all their savings in collapsed pyramid schemes. (AP Photo/Santiago Lyon)
Terry Labonte, left, of Corpus Christi, Texas, raises a finger in victory as he celebrates with his pit crew in victory lane after winning the Goody's 500 in Bristol, Tenn. early Sunday morning, Aug. 27, 1995. Among the 79,000-plus who showed up for theNASCAR Winston Cup series stock-car race in tobacco country, just about everybody seemed to agree on one thing: The Food and Drug Administration has no business trying to ban cigarette advertising at sports events (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Ronald Reagan as he appeared in a 1932-33 promotion when he worked as a sportscaster for WHO radio in Des Moines, Iowa. Photo is a copy of a postcard which was sent to people who wrote to Reagan at WHO. Reagan, who does not smoke, is pictured with pipe and dog, Peggy, in this advertisement for Kentucky Winner cigarettes and Kentucky Club pipe tobacco. (AP Photo)
R.J. Reynolds announced Thursday, July 10, 1997, that Joe Camel, the jazzy cartoon character blamed for luring kids to smoking, is being retired and replaced by this new ad containing Old Joe. (AP Photo/HO)
This is a 1948 ad for the Liggett Group featuring Ronald Reagan that was published in 1948 in Life Magazine. This and other ads featuring stars of the day are part of a tobacco exhibit at the Duke Homestead in Durham, N.C. (AP Photo/Karl DeBlaker)

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