WWII as seen through the
eyes of The New Yorker


The Second World War, during and after the period when it was fought, was the central event of a generation of Americans. Moreover, Americans at the time were fully aware of the importance of this war. As such it was the perfect topic from which to create magazine covers, which were quite often mediated representations of contemporary events. During the period from 1939-1945 (and especially after the United States joined the war in December 1941 following Pearl Harbor) The New Yorker spent many a cover reflecting both on the war itself and on the impact of the conflict on American culture. Examining how the magazine choose to portray scenes from this important cultural event, as well as which scenes were chosen for portrayel, can help to show how Americans at the time viewed the war itself, it's impact on contemporary national culture which aspects of it were most important to people at the time.

The War at Home

March 21, 1942

July 18, 1942

September 5, 1942

October 10, 1942


The War Abroad

July 27, 1940

August 22, 1942

November 14, 1942

December 26, 1942


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