Picus Capite toto rubro: The Red-headed Wood-pecker.

This bird weighs two ounces, the Bill sharp, somewhat compressed sideways, of a lead colour: the whole Head and Neck deep red: the under part of the Body and Rump white; as are the smaller Wing-feathers; which, when the Wings are closed, join to the the white on the Rump, and make a broad white patch cross the lower part of the back; the upper part of which is black, as are the Quill-feathers and Tail, which is short and stiff. In Virginia very few of these Birds are to be seen in winter: in Carolina there are more, but not so numerous as in summer; wherefore I conceive they retire Southward, to avoid the cold. This is the only one of the Wood-peckers that may be termed domestick, frequenting Villages and Plantations, and takes a peculiar delight in ratling with its Bill on the boarded houses. They are great devourers of fruit and grain.

The Hen in colour differs little or nothing from the Cock.


Quercus folio non serrato, in summitate quasi triangulo: The Water-Oak.

These grow no where but in low waterish lands: the Timber not durable, therefore of little use, except for fencing in fields. In mild winters they retain most of their leaves. Their Acorns are small and bitter, and are rejected by the hogs while others are to be found.

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