Parus Americanus Lutescens: The Pine-Creeper.

Weighs eight Penny-weight and five Grains. The Bill is black. The Upper-part of the Body, from the Bill to the Tail, of a yellowish green, The Neck and Breast yellow. The Belly near the tail, white. The Wings brown, with some Spots of white. The Tail brown; except the two outermost Feathers, which are half white. The Legs are dusky-black. The Hen is all over brown. They creep about Trees, particularly Pine- and Fir-Trees; from which they peck Insects and feed on them. These, with most of the other Creepers and Titmice, associate together in small Flights, and are mostly seen on leafless Trees in Winter.


Ligustrum Lauri folio, fructu violacco: The Purple-Berried Bay.

Usually sixteen Feet high, and the Trunc is from six to eight Inches in Diameter. The Leaves are very smooth, and of a brighter Green than the common Bay-Tree: Otherwise, in Shape and Manner of growing, it resembles it. In March from between the Leaves, shoot forth Spikes, two or three Inches in Length, consisting of tetrapetalous very small white Flowers, growing opposite to each other, on Foot-stalks half an Inch long. The Fruit, which succeeds, are globular Berries, about the Size of Those of the Bay, and cover'd with a Purple-colour'd Skin, enclosing a Kernel, which divides in the Middle.

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