The United States Senate


    Long of Louisana sits at the dest of Calhoun of South Carolina but the Greatest Deliberative Body in the World perserves a power which neither the Senate of Rome nor the Senate of the Venetians enjoyed.
SYMBOLS OF THE SENATE
. . . The U.S. Senate is a monument to the days Before The War. . . its most moving symbols are still such objects as the desk of Jefferson Davis shown above. . .
United States Senate
For the capitalist-supporting ventures of Fortune Magazine, all businesses and companies deserved a moment in the spotlight for the admiration of the American people. The star of this essay from March 1935 is the United States Senate, whose traditions, institutions and structures are exposed by the Fortune treatment. The story on the Senate has a few shots of interior spaces and exterior façades that work in the same way as art photography, but the most interesting photographs of this collection are the intimate interior places the photographer captured. The images of a reclining black single-seating couch beside that of George Washington's grave, followed by a narrow and claustrophobic mailroom, evoke feelings of awe in viewers. These immediate perceptions are further compounded by the captions--"In Life… In Death… And in Limbo." On a functional level, these photographs show how the Senate works--how the Senators prepare for the job, where they sit, and even how they rest. On a journalistic level, they tell a story of power, wealth, ability, and dedication. The Fortune photograph remains a cultural object infused with idealism and meaning.

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Other images from this essay

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