of Maiz or Indian Corn. They are so great Lovers of Potatoes, that when once discovered by them, it is with Difficulty they are deterred from getting the greatest Share. They have a great Command of their fore Paws, which by their Structure seem as much adapted to the grubbing up Roots as the Snouts of Hogs, and are much more expeditious at it. Nuts, Acorns, Grain, and Roots are their Food, several Kind of Berries by their long hanging are Part of their Autumn and Winter Subsistance, the Stones and indigested Parts appearing in their Dung, as those of the Cornus, Smilax, Tupelo, &c. the Berries of the Tupelo Tree are so excessive bitter, that at the Season Bears feed on them, their Flesh receives an ill Flavour. In March when Herrings run up the Creeks, and shallow Waters to spawn, Bears feed on them, and are very expert at pulling them out of the Water with their Paws. Their Flesh is also very rank and unsavory, but at all other Times is wholesome, well tasted, and I think excelled by none; the Fat is very sweet, and of the most easy Digestion of any other. I have myself, and have often seen others eat much more of it, than possibly we could of any other Fat without offending the Stomach.

A young Bear fed with Autumn's Plenty, is a most exquisite Dish. It is universally granted in America, that no Man, either Indian or European ever killed a Bear with young. The Inhabitants of James River in Virginia in one hard Winter killed several hundred Bears, amongst which was only two Females, which were not with young. This is a Fact notoriously known by the Inhabitants of that River, from many of whom I had it attested. They are notwithstanding their clumsy Appearance, very nimble Creatures, and will climbe the highest Trees with suprising Agility, and being wounded will descend Breech foremost, with great Fury and Resentment, to attack the Aggressor, who without armed Assistance has a bad Chance for his Life.


URSUS albus Marinus.
The White Bear.

The White Bear seems to be the most Northern Quadruped of any other, and is found most numerous within the Arctick Circle, on the Continents of both Europe and America. They are never found far within Land, but inhabit the Shores of frozen Seas, and on Islands of Ice; Their chief Food is Fish, particularly the Carcases of dead Whales cast on Shore; they also devour Seals, and what other Animals they can come at: They are very bold and voracious, which oblige the Northern Voyagers at their Whale Fishings, to be very vigilant in avoiding being devoured by them. Within there few Years there have been exhibited at London two of these Animals, one of which, tho' not above halt grown, was as big as two common Bears. By the Account given of them by Northern Voyagers they are of a mighty Stature at their full Growth; a Skin of one measur'd thirteen Feet in Length. In shape they much resemble the common Bear, yet differ from them in the following Particulars, viz. Their Bodies are covered with long thick woolly Hair, of a white Colour, their Ears are very small, short, and rounding, their Necks very thick, their Snouts thicker, and not so sharp as in the common Bear.

L U P U S.
The Wolf.

The Wolves in America are like those of Europe in Shape and Colour, but are somewhat smaller; they are more timerous and not so voracious as those of Europe; a Drove of them will flie from a Single Man, yet in very severe Weather there has been some Instances to the contrary. Wolves were domestick with the Indians, who had no other Dogs before those of Europe were introduced, since which the Breed of Wolves and European Dogs are mixed and become prolific. It is remarkable that the European Dogs that have no Mixture of Wolfifh Blood, have an Antipathy to those that have, and worry them whenever they meet, the Wolf-Breed act only defensively, and with his Tail between his Legs, endeavours to evade the others Fury. The Wolves in Carolina are very numerous, and more destructive than any other Animal: They go in Droves by Night, and hunt Deer like hounds, with dismal yelling Cries.

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